Police 'Knew Undercover Officer Was In A Relationship'

Police ‘Knew Undercover Officer Was In A Relationship’

Police chiefs were aware of an undercover police officer’s “deceitful” relationship with an environmental activist and allowed it to continue, according to newly revealed documents.

Kate Wilson was duped into a two-year relationship with now disgraced spy Mark Kennedy, and is now taking legal action against the Metropolitan Police and the National Police Chiefs Council, under the Human Rights Act.

Until now the police have insisted that they did not know of ‘spy cops’ having sexual relationships with activists they were investigating, stressing that such behaviour was strictly forbidden.

Police Apologise for Tricking Women Into Relationships

Video Credit:  Cops Campaign

The revelations come after an unprecedented move in November 2015, where the Met Police issued an unreserved apology to seven women.

The environmental activists had been tricked into sexual relationships by five undercover police officers, including Mark Kennedy. One of the so-called spy cops also became a father.

It has become apparent that some officers entered into long-term initimate sexual relationships which were abusive, decietful, manipulative and wrong.

Assistant Commissioner Hewitt

At the time, in issuing an apology, Assistant Commissioner Hewitt said: “It has become apparent that some officers entered into long-term intimate sexual relationships which were abusive, deceitful, manipulative and wrong.

“These should never have happened. They were a gross violation of personal dignity and integrity.”

Until today, police bosses claimed they were unaware of the relationships.

A Violation of Rights

Image Credit: Kate Wilson

In January 2016, Kate Wilson, became the eighth victim and won a case against the Metropolitan Police.

She’s also lodged a complaint that will go before the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (IPT), the body which investigates alleged wrongdoings by public bodies and law enforcement agencies.

Writing in The Guardian today, Ms Wilson called the relationship a “grave invasion” of her human rights, vowing to continue her fight for justice.

“After we settled in the high court, my human rights claim remained live in the IPT,” she explained. “I decided to continue the fight.

A grave invasion of my private and family life, and a violation of my rights to freedom of expression and assembly.

Kate Wilson

“The police have been forced to make a tiny amount of disclosure there, and already that has led to massive revelations: they now admit that what was done amounted to a violation of my right not to be subject to torture or inhumane and degrading treatment, a grave invasion of my private and family life and a violation of my rights to freedom of expression and assembly.

“They also admit that Kennedy’s handlers and line manager knew about and ‘acquiesced to’ his relationship with me.”

Campaigners also believe that Ms Wilson and the seven victims apologised to in November 2015 could be just the tip of the iceberg in terms of undercover police officers entering into deceitful sexual relationships.

Ms Wilson’s case goes before the Investigatory Powers Tribunal on October 3.

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About the Author

Rahul Verma

News Editor
Rahul is Rights Info's News and Social Media Editor. He is an experienced reporter and editor covering the under-represented, arts and culture and migrant communities, and has worked for national newspapers, youth media projects and creative agencies. He is hugely passionate about social justice, equality and a fairer world. To email Rahul, drop him a line. View all posts by Rahul Verma.
Police ‘Knew Undercover Officer Was In A Relationship’
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